Let’s imagine that someone drops a satchel filled with $300,000 cash in front of you. He tells you that you will get the money under one condition.

“After your presentation is done, I’m going to grab three members of your audience,” he says. “And I’m going to ask them to restate your key messages. If they can all tell me those messages without hesitation, then you get the money.”

Indeed, if your business presentation doesn’t pass the $300,000 challenge, then we feel you’ve failed as a presenter. After all, what good is a presentation that doesn’t leave the audience with a few clearly identifiable messages?

The key to meeting the challenge is identifying a few key messages and repeating them several times, coming back to them for reinforcement.

We worked with an insurance company recently in helping them come up with a pitch for a new piece of business. Their “$300,000 challenge” was as follows:

  • We will create effective policies and procedures.
  • We’ll implement those procedures.
  • Then we’ll monitor them over time and adjust as needed.

Of course, there were sub-points to be made. But no matter what, they were going to keep coming back to those main points to ensure that the listeners had clear takeaways.

Great presentations have impact. One way to measure the impact is to make a few key points and repeat them enough to embed them into your listeners’ minds. On your next presentation, make sure you pass the $300,000 challenge.


Joey Asher

Joey AsherJoey Asher has worked with thousands of business people helping them learn how to communicate in a way that connects with clients. His new book 15 Minutes Including Q&A: a Plan to Save the World from Lousy Presentations” is available now. He is also the author three previous books including “How to Win a Pitch: The Five Fundamentals That Will Distinguish You from the Competition”, “Selling and Communication Skills for Lawyers” and “Even A Geek Can Speak.”